Photographers Who Aren’t Writers, Take Heart

davidsimonton:

"I remember once working through more than a hundred drafts of a four-paragraph statement for [an exhibition] catalog, all to find something that would just keep out of the way of the pictures."

Robert Adams (“Writing,” from Why People Photograph)

(via photographsonthebrain)

fromand:

modern photography  [december 1979]

fromand:

modern photography [december 1979]

Landscape photography is the supreme test of the photographer - and often the supreme disappointment. — Ansel Adams
By my fourth year in school, I was shooting every day and every night. I photographed every little thing—all my food, doorways covered in graffiti, and my friends and roommates. I tortured my first boyfriend, Marc, by capturing each moment of our relationship. I was obsessed with documenting my life. So that’s my advice to you: Find something to be obsessed with, and then obsess over it. Don’t compete; find what’s uniquely yours. Take your experience of life and connect that with your knowledge of photographic history. Mix it all together, and create an artistic world that we can enter into.

Ryan McGinley’s Advice to Young Photographers: Don’t Compete:

http://www.aphotoeditor.com/2014/06/16/dont-compete-find-whats-uniquely-yours-and-obsess-over-it/

(via sessyargc)

manilacamerastyle:

Autofocus is a relative term.

manilacamerastyle:

Autofocus is a relative term.

I read somewhere that, in the sixties, over half of all households in America had a Polaroid or Instamatic camera, but I don’t think Robert Frank and Garry Winogrand were running around in a panic thinking, “It’s all over for us – everyone’s taking photographs!” Sean O’Hagan (via conscientious)

(via photographsonthebrain)

Rolleiflex and Hasselblad’s masters Reinhold Heidecke and Victor Hasselblad shooting each other, 1955.

Rolleiflex and Hasselblad’s masters Reinhold Heidecke and Victor Hasselblad shooting each other, 1955.

fromand:

leica m4 ad

fromand:

leica m4 ad

In the workshops I host, I am often asked why I chose this source of light, why I chose this way of lighting, this position of light, the power, direction etc etc. And often I answer: I do not know, because the process is intuitive, instinctive. But we all know that intuition is also “skill set,” one that totally unique to you.Trying different ways of lighting, searching for your own unique approaches, arguing with yourself and, ultimately finding your own solutions and methods – that is what will make you and your work better. — Oleg Ti, on Profoto Blog.